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Author Topic: The boring Andrew  (Read 2329 times)

Balgin Stondraeg

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The boring Andrew
« on: August 12, 2009, 10:35:25 AM »

Really doesn't look like an Andrew does he? Anyway, I've been running a post on FOD but here's the most recent picture so far.



FOD link.
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Keeper

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Re: The boring Andrew
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2009, 08:11:29 AM »

Looking really good Balgin :)

Who knows what an Andrew looks like  :shrug:  There are more Daves around than people realise ;)

I was wondering about your technique, though.  I find it easiest to paint up in layers, from the bottom-most first (skin, exposed gore, whatever) then up through the layers of clothes, typically doing weapons last.  I've noticed you don't have the same philosophy of painting.  Do you use any kind of rule-of-thumb to decide which bit to paint next?
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Balgin Stondraeg

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Re: The boring Andrew
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2009, 11:17:00 AM »

Looking really good Balgin :)

Who knows what an Andrew looks like  :shrug:  There are more Daves around than people realise ;)

I was wondering about your technique, though.  I find it easiest to paint up in layers, from the bottom-most first (skin, exposed gore, whatever) then up through the layers of clothes, typically doing weapons last.  I've noticed you don't have the same philosophy of painting.  Do you use any kind of rule-of-thumb to decide which bit to paint next?

Contours. I typicaly like to start with the deepst areas first then work my way outwrads. However, when two surfaces meet one is normaly more pominent than the other with there being a stepped edge. The painting priority then goes to the minimum cleanup. Sometimes when an edge protrudes out over something it's easy to paint up to the edge and then leave it. But if the edge is tall enough to warrant painting, it then ebcomes to paint it first, then the lower area can be painted up to the edge.

Also, when it comes to cleaning up unwanted paint, metallics are much harder to clean up than non metallic colours.

So I like to do the face first (it helps bring personality to the miniature) and thus, as much of the skin as I can get away with (contoutrs permitting). Then starting with the face, work out from there. But since metals are harder to clean up I often try to get them out of the way first if they're somewhere that's likely to get metal on a non metal area when I paint them.
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Keeper

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Re: The boring Andrew
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2009, 05:48:26 AM »

Thanks Balgin :)  I always find it intresting how other people approach these kinds of practical problems.

When you say clean-up, do you mean you try and remove errors whilst the paint is still wet, then? Or leave it to dry and overpaint?

Got to confess I usually try and safely remove whatever I can whilst wet (i.e., whatever I can do that does not make a huge mess) then leave it to dry, tease up anything left with a sharp knife - sometimes, especially if I missed the error before it dried, an error can be seperated from the underlying colour I want - and then patch over any remaining damage.

Or, preferably, try not to make mistakes in the first place, but usually that is a rather impossible task! LOL
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Balgin Stondraeg

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Re: The boring Andrew
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2009, 01:04:59 PM »

Some new photo's today. I painted the surcoat the same way I normaly do bone (bestial brown, snakebite leather, bronzed flesh, bleached bone). I'm not too happy with it as the snakebite leather seems to be showing through too much in the recesses. I know I did this on purpose as the bronzed flesh is too yellowy and not brown enough and the bleached bone is too bright for the shadows.

I also did a final 50/50 bleached bone/skull white highlight which came out really well and I'm very proud of it. I'm planning on dirtying the bottom of the surcoat up a little. I don't think I could do anything to reduce the blacklining effect on the surcaot without ruining it and having to paint it all over again :(. The red came out very nicely 'though. Hope you can all see the shadows in it. Before I started I was considering giving the entire surcoat a wash of devlan mud (very thinned down brown ink) as a finisher. I haven't done it but now I'm considering it as it might help smooth the colour transitions but it could also completely spoil it. I'll leave it 'till I've highlighted the cloak, painted his sleeve and done the buckle on his bag. The book pages will be done in my usual bone technique and then I'll make some pathetic attempt at freehand lines of writing. If I'm feeling really brave I';ll try borders and a finial (or whatever that capitol letter joining in to the border at the top of the page thing is called) but I suspect it'll just be squiggly black lines with gaps in them.











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PaulH

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Re: The boring Andrew
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2009, 10:15:24 PM »

Hi Balgin

You could just try Decals for the book. GW might still do them.

Cheers
Paul H
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Keeper

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Re: The boring Andrew
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2009, 05:39:37 AM »

I scanned therough the pics before reading your text (as is usually my wont) and I thought (and still think) that the surcoat is looking fantastic - nice and dirty like its been worn for a good long while in the field without ebing washed!

Keep up the good work ont he chap, Balgin and he'll be awesome when you've finished him :)
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Balgin Stondraeg

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Re: The boring Andrew
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2009, 09:34:35 AM »

Well he's been nearly finished for a few days now (neded some gap filling in the base). Have a few spoiler shots :p.

There's a book! Might even be astory about a shepherd called David in there too :p.





And look! Mud! Mud I say! (Or something dirty).





I'm tempted to try to put aspot of black inside each of the red squares to make it clear they're finials (or whatever those huge capitol letters that join into the border are caleld). I enjoyed putting dirt on the surcoat but I won't be adding blood to the sword. It looks more like a pre battle pose than something emerging mid combat. A touch of the light from the surcoat seems to have got on his overcoat so I'll fix that. Other than that he's pretty much done and hopefuly I'll havea finished thread up soon :). Standing Svala's almost as finished as he is.
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Keeper

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Re: The boring Andrew
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2009, 05:43:34 AM »

Good work, Mr S! :)
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